Risk of prostate cancer unaffected by antibiotic treatment

Source: MedWire News

The average age of the patients was 62.9 years. Average total PSA before and after treatment was 6.05 ng/ml and 5.55 ng/ml, respectively. On biopsy, 23% of patients had histologically proven prostate cancer. There were no significant differences between men with and without prostate cancer in age, pretreatment PSA, free PSA, percent free PSA, and PSA density.
Average total PSA, free PSA, and PSA density decreased after treatment in men with and without prostate cancer. But the reductions in total PSA and PSA density were not significant in prostate cancer patients and the reduction in free PSA in cancer-free patients was not significant.

This paper looked at treating patients with an elevated PSA and a normal rectal exam with antibiotics. The reason why this is important is that many urologists prescribe antibiotics for men with elevated PSA values and only biopsy them if the PSA is still elevated.

This study did not show a significant difference for men with and without prostate cancer for PSA changes. Both groups had a decline in PSA values.

This is not a conclusive study and the use of antibiotics is still an option in treating men with a high PSA. I personally like to start with a biopsy and not antibiotics in men that have never had a prostate biopsy.

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